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MUYAKA SHITANDA AND SWEET NOSTALGIA

The artist Muyaka Shitanda, born in Nairobi, Kenya, photographs the world while offering viewers an escape from reality for a moment to contemplate and be guided through the stories he captures with his eye and his work of image construction. A world whose beauty is defined by a certain aestheticism that he has developed by experimenting with various media, such as painting, sculpture, textiles, and the film industry. But it is with photography that he best manages to share his passion. 

© Shitanda

Shitanda is a multidisciplinary artist who plays with textures, colors, objects, but especially the experimental play of light and shadow, to observe a fusion of subjects with a powerful narrative for a result open to interpretation. This young artist shares his passion for craftsmanship while revealing, through each shot, a feeling that calls upon a distant memory, time, and place. 

Through a vintage aspect and the cultural reflection behind his artwork, he explores and interprets worlds that allow him to go back to a time he has not known. Moreover, Shitanda develops his own definition of beauty that he tells through his shots. 

© Shitanda
© Shitanda

Today, he is represented by Number 8 Gallery, a young contemporary art gallery that showcases emerging photographic artists with works that address common perceptions of identity, representation, and the human condition.

Behind his lens, Shitanda also emphasizes the sensuality and immediacy of a pose, of a model playing with him. But he does not stop at a simple freeze frame, a simple pause in time; Shitanda reworks the colors and settings to support the message he wants to convey as a sweet nostalgia of a time we could have known, without missing this mysterious part that frames his artistic vision with dualities and the border between fantasy and reality. 

© Shitanda

Shitanda summarizes and links his photographs to the poem Risk by Anaïs Nin, which he particularly appreciates: “And then came the day when the risk of remaining tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to bloom.”

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Thomas Durin